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Is your marriage in the emergency room or the morgue?

orlando real estate litigation attorneys dewitt law firm

During consultations, I often ask clients, “is your marriage in the emergency room or the morgue?” While this may seem like a peculiar question, the purpose is to ensure that as a potential client, you are committed to the divorce process. If you start the divorce process and decide to reconcile, it can be costly and can also have a long-lasting impact on your relationship. Divorce is a very personal decision and no attorney can decide whether you should or shouldn’t seek a divorce. If you are unsure about whether divorce is right for you, you should consult with a...

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When does alimony terminate?

If alimony is ordered by the Court as part of a final judgment, it will terminate upon the death of either party or upon the remarriage of the party receiving alimony. Additionally, an alimony award may be modified or terminated in accordance with section 61.14, Florida Statutes, which provides that alimony may be reduced or terminated if the person receiving alimony is in a supportive relationship with the person he or she resides. Further, alimony may be modified if (1) there is a substantial change in circumstances; (2) the change was not contemplated at the time of final judgment of...

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Will making an Uninsured Motorist Claim raise my insurance rates in Florida?

In Florida, insurance companies are prohibited from raising your rates for filing an uninsured or underinsured (UM) claim. However, if you receive certain discounts for not being in an accident for a set period of time, you may lose some of those discounts. This is independent of filing the claim as they would be eliminated by simply being in an accident....

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Child Support After the Age of Eighteen (18) in Florida

As a general rule, the legal duty of a parent to support his child ceases at the age of majority, which in the State of Florida is 18 years old. This is because a parent has no legal duty to continue to provide support to a child who has reached the age of majority, unless the trial court has made a finding of dependence pursuant to section 743.07(2), Florida Statutes, or the parties otherwise agree. However, child support may continue beyond the age of 18 years for a dependent person if: (1) the dependency is due to mental or physical...

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